The Difference Between Being a Salesman and Creating a Selling Relationship

  Right now I’m doing a lot of driving between Fort Collins and Colorado Springs while we try and sell our house and move as part of my new position as Operations Manager at Book Center of the Rockies. This commute really requires a small, gas-sipping vehicle while for several months I’ve been driving the […]

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Sell me the car I want!

Sell me the car I want!

 

Right now I’m doing a lot of driving between Fort Collins and Colorado Springs while we try and sell our house and move as part of my new position as Operations Manager at Book Center of the Rockies. This commute really requires a small, gas-sipping vehicle while for several months I’ve been driving the miracle minivan with over 300,000 miles. I don’t know why it hasn’t pulled out a gun and shot itself yet but last week it gave me a warning and so I started looking for a new (used) vehicle.

I sent email to two car dealers in Colorado Springs with very specific requirements. One on the south end of town sent me a list of vehicles that were the right make but all over the maximum price I was willing to pay. If you haven’t shopped at a car dealer before, this is a common tactic to see if you really meant the top price you said. I wrote back and told them that they didn’t actually read my email since none of the cars matched. That dealer never wrote back.

The second dealer, after I specifically said in an on-line chat to just send me links to cars that met my criteria and not to call me, called me at work to ask when I could come down to take a look. I told the sales lady that I had specifically asked for links only and reiterated my criteria. That afternoon I received an email with about ten links and another request for a time when I was going to come by the showroom. Of the ten vehicles, only ONE was even the correct manufacturer. I wrote back explaining that they hadn’t read my email.

The next day I received another email from a different sales rep containing…. the. exact. SAME. LIST. OF. VEHICLES. I had rejected the day before and a request to call with a time to come in. I wrote back and told her that she obviously had no interest in selling me what I wanted and to quit contacting me.

Today I received a perky email from a manager at the same dealership asking how my shopping was going. Obviously, she hadn’t bothered to check with here sales team first. I actually doubt the email was sent by a real person. I would bet money that it is just an automatic email that goes out if you respond to one of their sales reps.

It’s been so long since I’ve purchased a vehicle from a dealer (a bad experience then, too) that I hoped that these stupid tactics would have been abandoned for something REAL. I’m talking about a sales rep that asks questions and wants to know exactly what you want and why instead of focusing on getting you on the lot to sell you something you don’t need. Have these people read any sales and marketing books written in the last ten years?!

I honestly believe that selling these days is more about finding what your customer really needs and satisfying that. Once you do, you’ve earned loyalty because you listened to your customer.

So here’s your homework for the week. For the next business week, every time you have a customer come into your store, instead of asking “Can I help you?” Which typically results in a “No”, ask “What can I help you find?” It will at least make the customer pause since he has to come up with a full sentence response. If he doesn’t give you a specific product, ask at least two questions to better figure out what he is looking for. Remember, the goal here is to find the customer what he really needs / wants, not to sell him something. In some cases you may have to honestly say that you don’t have what he is looking for. Even then, if you can point him in the right direction, you have earned trust and that is something worth far more than the $4 you would make on that book you didn’t sell him.

[Image created by suphakit73 at freedigitalphotos.net]

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